Steve Stripling case study in changing nature of coaching

Posted by: Josh Kendall on Thursday January 17, 2013


Posted by: Josh Kendall on January 17, 2013

Steve Stripling has been a college football coach for a long time, but he hasn't spent much time in the South.

That much was evident when Stripling, who is Tennessee's new defensive line coach / assistant head coach, referred to his new home as the "SEC conference," but getting used to new territory comes with the business now, Stripling said.

"That's part of the coaching world these days, moving around," he said.

That's always been part of the job, but it's more prevalent now than ever. Take Stripling.

He was at Indiana from 1984-1996. In the 16 years since, he's been at seven schools.

His most recent stop was Cincinnati, where he served as interim head coach for the Belk Bowl. Stripling also was the interim head coach for Central Michigan during the 2010 GMAC Bowl. His teams won both games.

"People always ask you do you want to be a head coach? The answer is obviously yes, but the opportunities are limited. That's in a small way a chance to be a head coach for a game so it was a great opportunity," he said.

Stripling has played against Tennessee twice in his long career. That wasn't enough to get a full feel for the program's tradition, but it was plenty of time to learn "Rocky Top," he joked.

"The fight song? I've heard it a lot," he said.

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JoshKendall

Josh Kendall is a staff writer for CoachingSearch.com and has covered the SEC for more than 15 years for papers such as the Athens Banner-Herald, Macon Telegraph, and The State. He’s the father of two boys who he’s hoping don’t inherit his wide receiver frame and offensive guard feet. Follow @EyeOnCoaches on twitter and send your feedback to josh@coachingsearch.com




Josh Kendall is a staff writer for CoachingSearch.com and has covered the SEC for more than 15 years for papers such as the Athens Banner-Herald, Macon Telegraph, and The State. He’s the father of two boys who he’s hoping don’t inherit his wide receiver frame and offensive guard feet. Follow @EyeOnCoaches on twitter and send your feedback to josh@coachingsearch.com